Research

The Paul Ricard Oceanography Institute runs a research centre with its own team of scientists on the island of Les Embiez, on the French Mediterranean coast, near Toulon.

For thirty years, research was mainly focused on the quality of coastal waters with regard to health issues, with research programmes on sewage discharge and hydrocarbon pollution

Today, the research focus is more on:

  • Marine biodiversity and the impact of climate change;
  • The preservation of heritage species such as the grouper, the fan mussel and the seahorse;The management and monitoring of living resources: the edible sea-urchin and fish species of market value;
  • Ecological restoration: the installation of artificial reefs to restore life to degraded environments;
  • The study of solutions inspired by nature: to replace the toxic substances in anti-fouling paints used on the hulls of boats with natural molecules derived from the marine environment;
  • The impact of emergent molecules such as endocrine disruptors on the development of young marine organisms, such as the sea-urchin and the seahorse.

This research is in phase with the integrated and sustainable management of the natural spaces and marine resources of the planet: a common heritage to be safeguarded, managed and, where necessary, restored.

To this end, competencies are being developed in fields ranging from experimental aquaculture to ecological engineering, molecular biology and genetics.

The Paul Ricard Oceanography Institute runs a research centre with its own team of scientists on the island of Les Embiez, on the French Mediterranean coast, near Toulon.

For thirty years, research was mainly focused on the quality of coastal waters with regard to health issues, with research programmes on sewage discharge and hydrocarbon pollution

Today, the research focus is more on:

  • Marine biodiversity and the impact of climate change;
  • The preservation of heritage species such as the grouper, the fan mussel and the seahorse;The management and monitoring of living resources: the edible sea-urchin and fish species of market value;
  • Ecological restoration: the installation of artificial reefs to restore life to degraded environments;
  • The study of solutions inspired by nature: to replace the toxic substances in anti-fouling paints used on the hulls of boats with natural molecules derived from the marine environment;
  • The impact of emergent molecules such as endocrine disruptors on the development of young marine organisms, such as the sea-urchin and the seahorse.

This research is in phase with the integrated and sustainable management of the natural spaces and marine resources of the planet: a common heritage to be safeguarded, managed and, where necessary, restored.

To this end, competencies are being developed in fields ranging from experimental aquaculture to ecological engineering, molecular biology and genetics.